The inequality paradox

how capitalism can work for everyone by Douglas McWilliams

Written in English
Published: Pages: 319 Downloads: 921
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Subjects:

  • Capitalism,
  • Technological innovations,
  • Economic aspects,
  • Income distribution,
  • Economic history
  • About the Edition

    A leading economist challenges dominant theories on global inequality, discussing why wealth persistently remains in the hands of a few and how technological development threatens to create a scarcity of unskilled jobs that will lead to even greater inequality.

    Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (pages 283-304) and index.

    StatementDouglas McWilliams
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHC110.I5 .M376 2018
    The Physical Object
    Pagination319 pages
    Number of Pages319
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26977872M
    ISBN 10146831498X
    ISBN 109781468314984
    LC Control Number2018188428
    OCLC/WorldCa1061504125

Book chapter Full text access Chapter Two - Unpacking the Inequality Paradox: The Psychological Roots of Inequality and Social Class Paul K. Piff, Michael W. Kraus, Dacher Keltner. The best books on The Politics of Policymaking recommended by Jamila Michener. Inequality is coming not just from the economy; it is coming from politics and policy, says Jamila Michener, assistant professor of government at Cornell she chooses five books that showcase some of the best, most thought-provoking writing on the politics and consequences of policy. Unpacking the Inequality Paradox: The Psychological Roots of Inequality and Social Class Chapter (PDF Available) in Advances in Experimental Social Psychology January with 1, Reads.   The Gang Paradox tells a story about the Mexican American experience on the border, including gangs and institutional reactions to them. In clear, descriptive, and refreshingly reflexive language Durán argues that the reality of gangs is far from .

  The next chapter addresses the paradox within the book's title. While inequality in rich countries in rich countries has been growing from its postwar lows, the world has seen "a quite extraordinary reduction in poverty". Define 'poverty', then. According to the World Bank, the current poverty line, set in is $ (£ / zł) a : Michael Dembinski. The Inequality Paradox: How Capitalism Can Work for Everyone by economist Douglas McWilliams is published today in the United States by The Overlook Press.. In his illuminating new book, McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, but by technology and globalisation that have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops.   “The Nordic paradox posits a challenging research question that should not be ignored,” said co-investigator Juan Merlo, MD, PhD, Professor in the Unit for Social Epidemiology at the University of Lund in Malmo, Sweden. “After excluding the possibility of confounding and information bias, this paradox needs to be urgently understood.   In this pathbreaking book, Lorber argues that the whole point of the gender system today is to maintain structured gender inequality—to produce a subordinate class (women) that can be exploited as workers, sexual partners, childbearers, and emotional nurturers. "Paradoxes of Gender deserves to be read by both specialists and general.

  The Paradoxes of Inequality Octo April 6, / N In the wake of the financial crisis, and the re-establishment of massive corporate profits during a vertiginous economic period, the issue of inequality has become increasingly prominent amongst critical thinkers. Leslie McCall is an American sociologist and political is a Presidential Professor of political science and sociology at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and the Associate Director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality studies wealth and social inequality in American society, as well as opinions about inequality, from an intersectional perspective.

The inequality paradox by Douglas McWilliams Download PDF EPUB FB2

“In The Inequality Paradox, McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich but by technology and globalization, leading to rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops.” - Publishers Weekly/5(2).

From the inquisitive layperson to the professional economist or policymaker, The Inequality Paradox is essential listening for understanding the global economy in its present state. McWilliams is a fresh, authoritative voice entering the global discussion, making this book indispensable in preparing for the imminent economic challenges of our changing world/5(3).

“In The Inequality Paradox, McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich but by technology and globalization, leading to rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops.” - Publishers Weekly/5(3).

The Inequality Paradox provides an overview of the issue and then explores the dimensions of the problem. This is followed by chapters that examine the contributing causes and consequences as well as income inequality in other nations.

The concluding section of the volume presents possible policy responses to growing income : Richard S. Belous. In Part II, McWilliams challenges readers to understand a paradox: While poverty is falling worldwide, inequality is rising in many areas.

In Part III, the author narrows his focus by trying to grasp how the wealthy accumulated so much capital and whether their exalted status can be Author: Douglas Mcwilliams.

In his illuminating new book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests, but by technology and globalization tat have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops. The Gang Paradox tells a story about the Mexican American experience on the border, including gangs and institutional reactions to them.

In clear, descriptive, and refreshingly reflexive language Durán argues that the reality of gangs is far from its Cited by: 1. From the inquisitive layperson to the professional economist or policymaker, The Inequality Paradox is essential reading for understanding the global economy in its present state.

McWilliams is a fresh, authoritative voice entering the global discussion, making this book indispensable in preparing for the imminent economic challenges of our changing world.4/5(1).

Failure to reach most The inequality paradox book populations is known as the inequality paradox [19]. Community initiatives, particularly in low-income communities, where a greater proportion of children may be.

It is a real pleasure to be able to join my friend Doug McWilliams at the launch of his latest book, ‘The Inequality Paradox’. I have known Doug, as. In his illuminating new book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests, but by technology and globalization that have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops/5(19).

From the inquisitive layperson to the professional economist or policymaker, The Inequality Paradox is essential listening for understanding the global economy in its present state.

McWilliams is a fresh, authoritative voice entering the global discussion, making this book indispensable in preparing for the imminent economic challenges of our changing world. In order to understand the paradox of economic inequality, we must first realize that the matter is not one of individuals, but one of social classes.

Social standing defines people’s access to food, housing, education, healthcare and opportunities [28]; as such, it has incredible control over someone’s life, and makes up a great part of. The inequality paradox: how capitalism can work for everyone. [Douglas McWilliams] -- A leading economist challenges dominant theories on global inequality, discussing why wealth persistently remains in the hands of a few and how technological development threatens to create a.

Genre/Form: Conference papers and proceedings Congresses: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Inequality paradox. Washington, D.C.: National Policy. Get this from a library. The inequality paradox: how capitalism can work for everyone. [Douglas McWilliams] -- In his illuminating new book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests.

Buy The Inequality Paradox: How Capitalism Can Work for Everyone Unabridged by McWilliams, Douglas, Doyle, Gerard (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.4/5(1).

Paradox Despite the reality of rising inequalities, people in more unequal societies show less concern about it Solution Rising inequality and segregation mean that the rich and poor live increasingly insulated lives; unable to see the full extent of inequality and its structural rootsFile Size: 3MB.

There is an inequality paradox in New Zealand. Despite increasingly frequent newspaper headlines on inequality, the data shows that inequality in income and inequality in consumption have not changed substantially for at least a decade.

However, this does not mean we need to forget about it and move on – far from it. This, though, is a global phenomenon and one that the well-known British economist addresses in his new book, The Inequality Paradox: How Capitalism Can Work for Everyone, which was officially.

Given this background, we now examine the psychological processes by which individuals create and perpetuate social class hierarchies.

Specifically, we seek to illuminate the inequality paradox, why people act in ways that support the economic status quo even when it cannot benefit them, why upper-class individuals might pursue greater personal advantage rather than the common good, and what Cited by: Call it the conservative inequality paradox: Either conservatives have overstated the amount of crony capitalism, or their dismissal of the concept of inequality as envy is misplaced.

Books Music Art & design TV & radio Stage Inequality South Korea’s inequality paradox: long life, good health and poverty But the report also exposed a paradox. In his illuminating new book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests, but by technology and globalization that have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops.

But what are the implications of this seeming contradiction, and what ultimately drives the global distribution of wealth. The groundbreaking and timely challenge to dominant theories on global inequality by leading economist Douglas McWilliams. In his illuminating book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests, but by technology and globalization that have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops.

The groundbreaking and timely challenge to dominant theories on global inequality by leading economist Douglas McWilliams In his illuminating book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests, but by technology and globalization that have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide Author: Douglas Mcwilliams.

Douglas McWilliams‘ The Inequality Paradox is published today by Abrams & Chronicle Books. In his illuminating new book, Douglas McWilliams argues that inequality is largely driven not by a conspiracy of the rich, as Thomas Piketty suggests, but by technology and globalization that have led to the paradox of rising inequality even as worldwide poverty drops.

Request PDF | On Jan 1,K.L. Frohlich and others published The inequality paradox: the population approach and vulnerable populations | Find, read and cite all the research you need on. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. Townsend, Peter, Nick Davidson, and Margaret Whitehead ().

More on Society from The Inequality Paradox. More on Society from The Inequality Paradox. In his book Reasons and Persons (), the British philosopher of ethics, identity, and rationality Derek Parfit identified the mere addition paradox, which is also known as the repugnant conclusion paradox.

The paradox is a utilitarian problem of ethics that arises when we question utilitarianism itself. Utilitarianism is a common belief. The paradox of prosperity. By Andrew Moody. Friday, Septem This, though, is a global phenomenon and one that the well-known British economist addresses in his new book, The Inequality Paradox: How Capitalism Can Work for Everyone, which was .The Nordic Gender Equality Paradox.

That is the new and quite interesting book by Nima Sanandaji. The main point is that there are plenty of Nordic women in politics, or on company boards, but few CEOs or senior managers. Op-ed: The Conservative Inequality Paradox.

By Niskanen Center Octo *This piece originally ran in National Review. Conservatives have two intellectual commitments that are increasingly incompatible.

They believe that the American economy is clogged up with crony-capitalist corruption that hands out special favors and protections to.